Stream: Lotic at Unsound (exclusive)

29 Oct 2014 — Henning Lahmann

Of the three different stages inside Krakow's decaying late-communist Hotel Forum – the venue where Unsound's main club nights are staged on the festival's closing weekend – Room 3 is probably the toughest to unleash a proper party in, at it's essentially a large bar by design, not exactly a dancefloor. Which is why, I'd argue, it takes some particularly talented or rather ruthless DJs to keep up the excitement for a whole night. Enter Berlin's Janus crew, who took over the room on Friday night, running on a bill programmed by Unsound together with CTM's Berlin Current project, as reported earlier. Unsound's Polish and international crowd didn't hesitate to buy into the vibe, providing a setting that in its best moments at least came very close to the most relentless nights at Janus' home base Chesters. As per usual, Lotic's hour was especially marked by a dazzling, unapologetic yet infectious eclecticism, and we're happy to exclusively present the live recording of his set below, which was kindly provided by London's NTS Radio.

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Unsound Preview: Janus / Kablam

15 Oct 2014 — Henning Lahmann

Krakow's Unsound Festival started on Sunday and so far it's been a Golden October dream, perhaps despite that true nightmare that was the early afternoon showing of Andrzej Żuławski's 1981 relationship drama-cum-horror movie "Possession" that I'm still trying to wrap my mind around. "The Dream" is also this year's festival theme – described by the curators as "a symptom of a world where self-expression and experience are increasingly mediated and commodified. It plays out on laptops used for work and leisure, in networked coffee shops, airports, international 'artistic enclaves' and nightclubs. Anxiety is its underside: those Living The Dream often do so in precarious financial situations, while in the background, ecological, political and economic systems lurch towards collapse; war looms on the horizon, threatening to escalate."

In more than one sense of the word, in the past few years Berlin has become The Dream for more and more musicians from all over the world, who mostly seem to come to the city in the search of exactly that: a place that is somewhat detached from the troubles of globalised late capitalism, where artistic expression is still possible due to a still comparably reasonable cost of living, and an overall attitude just liberal enough to not become an obstacle. Whether Berlin really is or has even ever been that dream place is one question, the other more pressing is in which way the expat community itself has started a process that's fundamentally changing the dynamic of the city's social geography. Soon, it'll be time to reflect on the sustainability of the dream. Artists have already started leaving Berlin again, moving to Leipzig or further east, with Krakow among a growing list of cities that now embody the illusion of a culturally rich location that willingly provides the means to devote yourself entirely to creative activity, without being forced to compromise. Which begs the creeping question – has it ever been about Berlin at all? "How do ideas of locality – or the lack of them – affect culture?," asks the panel "Place/Displace/Non-Place" at Naodowy Stary Teatr on Friday at 3.45, featuring some writers who should have to say something about that as expats in various European locations themselves.

However for the time being, legitimately focusing on the upsides of Berlin's evolvement into a truly global creative hub, the Musicboard-funded Berlin Current poject by CTM Festival has started to showcase some of the exciting aspects of the expat scene along the Spree. Over the past two years the Janus night has certainly become the epitome of New Berlin. Still, considering the aforementioned, it isn't entirely clear whether the scene around Janus is even a Berlin thing – or merely something that was started here by accident. After its first Berghain night last Friday the Janus crew is coming to Unsound Festival this week. In anticipation of the event and in order to explore some of the topics just mentioned, we spoke to resident DJ Kajsa Blom aka KABLAM via email. Read the interview after the break.

CTM's Berlin Current showcase featuring the Janus crew is part of Unsound Festival's night "The Ticket That Exploded Part 1", happening at Hotel Forum on Friday, October 17. More information on the event is available over here.

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Try to describe Janus in one sentence.

Hype, hate, copy

In which way does the night's concept embody an approach to club music that was missing in Berlin?

I would say its concept is genre-crossing, rude, more fearless and more diverse than what usually is being served in Berlin’s nightlife.

What does Berlin have to do with it in the first place? You've had a night in NYC already and now you're gonna be at Unsound. In which way is Janus' sound essential to Berlin; could it exist without the city or is its location wholly incidental anyway?

Having a space like Chesters really played a big role. A space like that would probably be impossible to find in NYC or Stockholm. It was not too big, not too small and had a great sound system for that size. It worked as this residency where we could try out things. For me having never really DJ’d before, this was the perfect place to try out things and learn.

What do you like about the Berlin crowd? Do you find it particularly open-minded or rather the opposite, still fixated on techno and house?

The ”Berlin crowd” is quite diverse I would say, but there is definitely still a huge crowd fixated on techno and house. Don’t get me wrong, I love dancing to hard techno, and I really respect a good techno DJ, but it’s almost like a different occupation. Using the CDJs you can manipulate the tracks in ways you can’t do on a record player. I think a large part of the Berlin crowd still wants to see DJs who play records, but I believe that’s slowly changing too.

How long have you been in Berlin now? Do you think that the place is getting more or less interesting? What are some developments that concern you?

I’ve been in Berlin for two years, but I am currently in Stockholm to write my BA thesis. I definitely think it’s getting more interesting, but that is my individual experience. I think it is intact with me discovering more parts, areas and scenes, opening up my eyes and ears more and more. 

Janus is usually depicted as this Brooklyn thing that came to Berlin – by the New York Times anyway. You are from Sweden, right? How did you get in touch with the rest, and how do you fit in from your own perspective?

I am from Sweden, but I am half-German. It is kind of not a Brooklyn thing-- no one in the Janus crew is from Brooklyn. I was not a part of Janus from the beginning but I was at almost every Janus party before I became a resident, and that’s how I got to know Dan, Michael, J’Kerian (Lotic) and James (M.E.S.H.). I had never felt at home in a club environment before. I loved how they approached the whole idea of what a club can be and I loved how they played so fearlessly. Last August Dan asked if I wanted to play a Janus night; I said yes although I had never really mastered the CDJ-2000 before. So I watched some Youtube tutorials, went there and played a bunch of Jersey club tracks and they liked it. I can’t point out exactly what it is that we share that make us work together, we just belong together, it just makes sense.

What are you trying to achieve with your own work? What's your main incentive to do the stuff you're doing?

Whoa, what am I trying to achieve…? I guess I want to produce something that sounds exactly like me in that moment. But it’s also about being fearless, not being afraid to fail. It’s gonna sound corny maybe, but I think my main incentive lies in the creation of ’the new’. When new thoughts and ideas are born, just in that moment, there is a sense of complete freedom. Of course new ideas aren’t born out of nothing like some kind of magic, most of the time they are born as an opposition toward existing norms. I hate genre categorization for instance, this is something that is flooded by norms. I hate the genre term ’IDM’ (Intelligent Dance Music)-- why is that type of music more intelligent than other dance music? EDM is not less intelligent than IDM. Let’s talk about what it actually sounds like and how it makes us feel. Let’s stop forcing music, and people, into categories that they have not asked to be a part of.

Adding this spatial dimension, like a more or less public space where these ideas can take form and be introduced and exchanged, that makes it real. I used to think my music experiments were made just for me, but I was wrong!

What's next for you artistically? What do you expect from the Berlin Current funding? Is there anything in the works already that you could tell us about, or is it mainly your participation in the showcases?

It is mainly my participation in the showcases. The night we did at Berghain was the most insane and beautiful, and now we are doing another night at the Unsound festival on Friday with Dj Hvad and Amnesia Scanner. I am super excited! I don’t know what’s next. With my own stuff I am still trying to figure out what direction to go in and it is an interesting phase because it takes me to all kinds of places.

Win Tickets for the CTM Prelude with Suzanne Ciani at Volksbühne

08 Oct 2014 — Henning Lahmann

The 16th edition of Berlin's cherished CTM Festival will kick off on January 23, 2015 under the theme Un Tune, but already on October 24 you can have quite a significant foretaste of thing to come when American synth pioneer Suzanne Ciani plays Volksbühne to improvise on the legendary Buchla synthesizer for a collaboration with Neotantrik aka Andy Votel and Demdike Stare's Sean Canty. Having released some of Ciani's early work on their acclaimed imprint Finders Keepers in 2012, the two already built an intimate artistic relationship with the composer before launching the current project together. The video below shows the trio at a performance at Lincoln Center in New York City in April. The evening will be completed by another stunning joining of forces, Mark Fell coming together with Keith Fullerton Whitman to coalesce their approaches to electronic music radicalism.

We're giving away 1x2 tickets for this highly recommended show. Just send an email with the subject "Suzanne Ciani" to submissions@nofearofpop.net before October 20, 12pm CET.

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NFOP Recommends: Polymorphism x Janus

07 Oct 2014 — Henning Lahmann

Though unfortunately dubbed "Brooklyn Bohemians" who spread out to "invade Berlin's techno scene" by none less than the New York Times in February of this year and equally unfortunately included in Electronic Beats' rather ill-fated because oddly biased list of "Five Berlin Club Nights That Have Nothing to do With House or Techno", the folks of Janus have done a lot to make this city's club scene a lot more colourful and interesting in the past few years, and that holds true even if you're not the biggest fan of their chosen location, Chesters. This Friday however, the Janus residents KABLAM, M.E.S.H., and Lotic are about to leave their familiar playground in order to "search for the sound that doesn't exist" in a place that's famous for its very distinct definition of a proper Berlin weekend night and yes of course, Ms Blanning, it has very much to do with house and/or techno. Luckily though, Berghain is of course open-minded enough to welcome the 4/4-evasive renegades for another installment of CTM's Polymorphism series, which will host the principal Janus artists as part of their Berlin Current project, which is still proudly supported by No Fear Of Pop. The three will be accompanied by a fine selection of bass-inclined musicians Jam City, Total Freedom, boychild, TCF, and DJ Hvad. Warmly recommended by us – if you ever wondered what a Janus night would look (and sound!) like beyond the realms of Chesters, you know where to go this Friday.

Check out more details on the FB event page over here.






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Watch: UMA “Calm/Easy”

03 Oct 2014 — Johanne Swanson

I wanna know all about how your mind knows how to feel calm and easy. Did you try eating raw, maniacally pressing green juice, or doing a shit-ton of yoga? Maybe you surrounded yourself by beautiful things and popped some pills, but eventually found that the best plan of action was to get messy with a pile of Benjamins. These are at least our suggested strategies on the new video from Berlin's very own UMA, producer power couple Ella and Florian Zwietnig. Get a little blurry with their highly polished, perfect-pop-song sensibility and be sure to catch their dynamic live show on the remainder of their European dates. Here at NFOP, we're especially looking forward to tonight's performance at Kantine am Berghain with Florida's Hundred Waters

"Calm/Easy" is off UMA's debut self-titled album out last May on Austria's Seayou Records. They are currently in the midst of a European tour with the following dates remaining:

10/3 Berlin, GER - Kantine am Berghain
10/4 Ausberg, GER Augsburg - Soho Stage
10/6 Winterthur, SUI - Portier
10/8 Graz, AUT - Steirischer Herbst
10/9 Munich, GER - Milla
10/10 Bern, SUI - Dampfzentrale
10/11 Nürnberg, GER - USG 6

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NFOP Recommends: Hannah Diamond at Südblock

15 Sep 2014 — Johanne Swanson

We can be thankful for our times and the categories of gender fluidizing; meaning more or meaning less, one thing is sure: those comfortable binaries of 'man' and 'woman' are being dismantled. A net label like P.C. Music in this context, with its founder and primary producer A.G. Cook and starlette Hannah Diamond proselytising all things girly, proclaiming we look good in pink and blue, isn’t just aesthetics, it’s borderline dissident. The linear range of cute to subversive is getting fucked, and we couldn’t be having a bigger party in the process. It’s so immoderate, so garish, that FACT Magazine has called them “the most divisive recent event in UK music.”

The few shows that Hannah Diamond has played have been described as “Hannah Diamond ft. The Audience, who are shouting the lyrics at her and at each other like it's the only song anyone knows.” Thanks to our friends over at Creamcake, we’ll see how our likely-more-reserved German audience responds this Saturday at Südblock as Hannah Diamond makes her Berlin debut with A.G. Cook in support. Bring your girlfriends, bring your boyfriends, and hold their hands while you yell along, oh Hannah, we’ve waited for soo-ooo-ooo long for a grrrl like you. RSVP here.

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Preview: Decibel 2014 NFOP Favorites

13 Sep 2014 — Evelyn Malinowski

Last year Kelsie and I had the pleasure of attending Seattle's beloved and rather large Decibel Festival. While the overall curation of this event was and will continue to be professionally executed, one thing that stuck out as a negative was the line-up's startling lack of female artists. This year, however, there are more than a handful female artists, as well as a wide range of acts that use electronic instruments in various ways to relay diverse messages. By presenting an expansive line-up, Decibel ends up appealling to all types of music lovers, whether techno and club music agrees with them or not, which is a deed that affectively and somewhat diplomatically assists in adjusting the North American attitude toward electronic music. Starting small and intimate, dB has turned into a crucial beacon for techno advocation and forward thinking in the States. It is put on yearly by passionate fans and strong believers in the many assets offered by this world of music and sounds.

Below is a list of NFOP-recommended artists who are playing this year. Some of them you will know, some of them might be new to you. Some we have collaborated with and reviewed, others we will be supporting, or continuing to support, in the years to come. I'll post a recap post-festival.

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Natasha Kmeto – Portland (Dropping Gems/Federal Prism)
Natasha has made several appearances on NFOP. For proudest example, she contributed a guest post last year in response to our feelings on Decibel's 2013 line-up. Apart from proving to be a reliable voice in political matters within the arts, Natasha's music is compelling, bold, successful in blurring the lines between genres, which helps blurs the lines of conventions, and, yes, it is sexy. With its hues of r-n-b, otherwise clubby grooves and understatedly fantastic beat work, there is something for everyone in her grooves. Further, her live sets are brilliant, full of energy and sweat. She works the crowd like an MC, like a DJ, like a back-up singer taking center stage for thirty minutes or more, like a professional performer. I've seen her live twice now, and I imagine the third time will be even sweatier.

Natasha's performance will be part of the commencing showcase, or Opening Gala, Sept. 24th at the EMP Sky Church. Accompanying her groove will be visual work from EFFIXX, whose aesthetic consecrates the place where all tricksters hang out, that nexus of unlikely components. In this case, its technology, mysticism and mythology.

Ana Sia – San Francisco (Frite Nite)
With Ana Sia, you can experience both some minimal techno attitude and comprehensive, animated percussion. The tracks are filtered through aberration, equipped with frequent swells and corresponding perigees, and embedded with archetypal vocal samples, Detroit style - it's nastily delicious. It's upbeat but semi-dark, breakbeat-ish, and demonstrative of Ana's playful command. Take “Imma Boss” for example, where a warehouse melody greets us with cadenced drums, which transform around more than that rave melody. Isn't it usually the opposite? Ana Sia runs appropriately with the Bay's Frite Nite crew.

Ana Sia will be playing the 24th at Neumos for the Bassdrop Presents Showcase between Seattle's WD4D and the one and only Prefuse 73.

Sassmouth - Chicago (God Particle)
Sam Kern aka Sassmouth has been behind the wheels for years upon years, actively pursuing the challenge of connecting songs as seamlessly as possible, without ever dropping the mood. Sometimes, such a task requires smaller bits and bolts, neutral ground, and suggestive, repetitive flare. As the founder of the God Particle label, which operates solely to manufacture, release, and promote simple, straightforward bits and bolts to fill and level out mixes, Kern can be considered a conduit for the house DJ continuum, a clever fan and musician who has augmented and celebrates the side of DJing that requires "filler" songs. She is also somewhat of an icon for the neverending pure, midwestern house mix, even though the mix does end. 

Sassmouth will be playing Sunday the 28th alongside Brian Lyons vs. Nordic Soul and London's T.Williams at Re-Bar.

Total Freedom – Los Angeles (Fade To Mind)
I've had two random club-drop-ins where Total Freedom was in overwhelming command of the crowd. Both times, I freaked out dancing uncontrollably, throwing away the idea that I was only going to be there for thirty minutes. Ashland Mines' authority is accomplished and maintained by frequent song-changing and a fast-but-not-too-fast tempo. Additionally, there's some kind of appetite for noise afoot in his sets as well as productions. It isn't dubstep, it isn't d-n-b throwback either: it's Total Freedom. Additionally, Mines is an active and influential collaborator, and has worked with Kelela, Gang Gang Dance, Nguzunguzu and many others.

Total Freedom will appear at the rather enthralling Optical 1: Kinesthesia Showcase on Sept. 24th at the EMP Sky Church. Basically, it's important that you make it to this session, because Arca will be performing with Live/AV from Jesse Kanda followed by more live/av from Max Cooper and The Sight Below. Optical 1 is likely to be a comprehensive experience in where noise, post-pop hip-hop, and techno mysticism all collide.

Rrose – New York (Eaux/Sandwell District)
Deliberately obfuscating and somewhat politically satirical via dark yet rich textures, Rrose is doubtlessly one of today's most innovative producers. Spiritual and avant-garde, Rrose emerges from the Sandwell District realm, a place revered for poignantly perfect techno packaged by images of skulls, dead birds, and other Halloween-all-year tokens. Despite this tone, the sounds of Rrose are extremely healing by way of their intrinsic softness, gradualism, and unapologetic repetitiousness. Parts of what is represented through this act touch on the same ethos that Nik Void of Factory Floor and Chris & Cosey evoke, however with less colors: a history of techno before techno gestated, combined with modernity's industrial weariness, all in the language of contemporary techno.

The Pitchblack Showcase at Re-Bar on the 24th will likely be one of this year's strongest events, complete with Vatican Shadow and Black Asteroid.

Cock & Swan – Seattle (Hush Hush)
Our own Kelsie Brown noted Cock & Swan's musical longevity half a year ago. Their sound can be described as indie dreamscape with soothing lyricism, as it uses just enough electronics to get to where they need to go. At times they display inclination toward old school downtempo, Lamb-like or Alpha-like structures. As part of the Hush Hush label, where Slow Year and Chants likewise reside, Cock & Swan stand out as perhaps the more organic act available on the roster; that isn't to say they don't fit harmoniously in what the overall atmosphere of Hush Hush is. I find Hush Hush a bit nostalgic for the early Leaf Label, with solemn and well-garbed artists. It's music that channels the sound of rain against the window on most days.

Cock & Swan will play the Hush Hush Showcase Friday Sept. 26th at the JBL Theater with Slow Year, Hanssen, and Kid Smpl.

Braids/Blue Hawaii – Montreal, CA (Arbutus/Full Time Hobby/Flemish Eye)
Braids and Blue Hawaii are NFOP all-stars, and their commonality, Raphaelle Standell-Preston, can be regarded as one of our favorite singers. Braids are originally Calgary and now Montreal-based production geniuses, touching on glitch, experimental, and pop. Their rather devoted international fan base speaks a volume or two to the quality and emotionality of their live performances. It's indeed fascinating to watch drummer Austin Tuffs play the piano part in the gorgeous, rainy track “Girl” on his drum pad (which he isn't doing in this video); it's stimulating to witness their detailed electronic songs deconstructed and played by physical movement. Braids are an exemplary and literal electronic music band.

Blue Hawaii is made of Standell-Preston and her dear friend Alex Cowan. Their second release “Untogether” caused quite a ruckus within the NFOP community as well as the neo-pop subculture. Its dancey, sentimental complexity, seen by the cover image of the two members embracing and disappearing as they do, reflects on the contemporary attitude toward relinquishing youth, physical distance, and confusing friendship for romance. Check out NFOP's BCR show with Alex here.

Definitely catch Braids do their spectacular thing at The Crocodile on the 24th for The Haunted Pop Showcase, which also will host Son Lux, Manatee Commune and Helado Negro. Blue Hawaii will play the Sines Of Life Showcase on the 26th at Showbox alongside El Ten Elevent, Yppah, and Vox Mod.

Andy Stott – Manchester, UK (Modern Love)
Stott is the prince of slow disco, or perhaps by now, the king. Drawing on UK bass, ambient, dub and some other kind of divine but not cheesy force, Stott's work engenders that we silently contemplate ephemeral matters, impermanence, and wet dreams about time travel as the music washes over us. Frequently coded over with striking vocals while the melodic aspects throbbingly waver in and out of clear earshot, this is the music of the death of summer as well as truths about where the big 2012 cultural shift is leading us – not to an apocalyptic place, I'd say. That's too singular of an answer.

YES YES YES YES Modern Love Showcase also with Millie & Andrea (Miles Whitaker and Stott) and Demdike Stare is at the EMP Level 3 on Friday the 25th!!

ASC – San Diego (Auxiliary/Silent Season)
Really excited to see James Clements on the line-up. I've liked his sparse, beautiful music for some years, as it can go into either aggressive jungle territory or back to childlike wondering-what-it's-like-to-fly curiosity. With plenty of indication of UK hardcore and drum-n-bass in his work, ASC also manages to bring something timeless and personal to the world of ambient pad music. It's a pastoral, overcast, chilly place, which makes one think, “Just five more minutes, then back inside for tea.” Clements' latest Truth Be Told is Bvdub-esque, meditative lamentation for something perpetually out of reach. It was released by Vancouver's Silent Season imprint, which lauds the vastness of foggy temperate rainforests and the creatures that dwell therein. As opposed to some of his older work, Clements' fresher sound is coded with genuine praise for all things beautiful and the human experience. Such declaration correlates with the growing cultural trend of using technology and digitally produced sounds to better commune with the natural world. There is so much to learn from this seeming paradox, and I'm not just saying that because it's been important to me for most of my life.

ASC is part of the Silent Season Showcase on the 26th at the JBL Theater. Be sure to not miss a DJ set by label founder Jamie McCue, Segue, nor visuals from Danthon.

Oneohtrix Point Never + Nate Boyce - New York (Warp)
DID YOU KNOW that OPN recently went on tour with Soundgarden and the Nine Inch Nails? It's true, shocking, and pretty profound. This tidbit probably settles with most of us agreeably, for OPN's music implies a type of laziness and Nintendo Peter Pan personality, who still has Soundgarden posters up in his bedroom, above the dirty clothes bin. Boyce's early 90s, glistening apartment aesthetic fits OPN's melted video game cartridge sound. Need I say more?

OPN + Boyce will be performing at Optical 3: Playful Discord alongside Kangding Ray and Atom TM's HD/AV at the EMP Sky Church. Really looking forward to this - it'll be an event that re-centers its audience about where/how the recent exhumation of interest in walking through dissonant, atonal spaces originated.

Nordic Soul – Seattle (Decibel/Studio 4//4)
Nordic Soul is Sean Horton's DJ guise. As the founder of dB, Horton commonly plays showcases, which is doubtlessly one of the ways for Horton to more fluently interact with attendees, attendants, and artists. I had the pleasure of first catching a Nordic Soul set here in Missoula, Montana during the inaugral DAT Music Conference. Horton threw down classics new and old, covered a range of styles but never with any kind of strain, confusion, or lack of vividness. There remained a certain amount of dreaminess throughout those two hours. It was wholesome, devoted, and somewhat transcendental.

Catch Nordic Soul and Bryan Lyons dualing set Sept. 28 at Flammable: Decibel Edition going down at Re-Bar alongside Sassmouth and T.Williams.

Isis Graham – Calgary, CA (Substation)
There's been more and more substantial material being broadcasted out of Alberta. Apart from Normals Welcome, an Edmonton-based label, Calgary's Substation Recordings has the goods. Isis Graham, a considerably prolific producer and remixer, gets the job done with cadenced house and easily consumable clubby grooves. As an integral part of the Girls On Decks collective, Graham can be treated as a succeeding advocate for quality techno plus gender awareness in Canada. Such a revival in Canada surely speaks to a greater North American call-to-arms for forward thinking electronic music. At it since the late 90s, Graham is a hand of perseverance and stylistic wisdom.

Go out with a bang closing night at the All Gone Pete Tong Showcase with Tensnake and Pete Tong himself Sept. 28th at Q.

Vatican Shadow – Los Angeles (Hospital Productions/Blackest Ever Black/Modern Love)
Complete with Reich referencing, black and white color scheme, and dark, hypnotic, and militant tracks, Dominick Fernow's project concurringly affliates with Blackest Ever Black as well as Modern Love, but mostly releases on his own Hospital Productions, along with work by Silent Servant, Ron Morelli, and Kevin Drumm. Since the late 90s, Fernow has been busy working to bring industrial techno and meandering, dark dance music together in unqiue ways, and so far, we're barely touching the tip of the iceberg. His latest, Death Is Unity With God, is an extensive release bearing several apposite titles for the moniker created only to comment on and convey post-Catholic apocalypse esoterica. 

Catch VS Sept. 24 for the Pitchblack Showcase at Re-Bar.

NFOP Presents: Girl Band at ACUD

03 Sep 2014 — Henning Lahmann

While we had to admit to be mildly irritated by their name, The Quietus thinks of Girl Band as "Dublin's finest exponents of hulking, screech-laced noise rock", and who were we to argue with London's finest analysts of contemporary dude rock? Right. There's a brand new video for the band's latest single "De Bom Bom", which we called fresh and angry and aimless, and while avoiding the word "rock" like the plague, we did say noise and forceful and revolt and put all these words into one single sentence, which now makes us seem like the palest imitation of the London lads' mighty wordsmiths; so the joke's really on us, basically. Anyway, what we wanted to point out originally was that the release of said video is only too fitting, as Girl Band are coming to town this Saturday, September 6, more precisely to the wonderful ACUD in Mitte, and the whole thing is presented and warmly recommended by, who would have thunk, No Fear Of Pop. So come by, if only in order to punch us in the face while we're providing pre- and post-show DJ mimicry, playing music that will probably feature noise, but certainly no rock.

Ignore what we just said and check out the event details right here.

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