NFOP x Kometenmelodien: LA Priest, Laura Clock & Lea Porcelain

30 Nov 2015 — Henning Lahmann

After our smashing first edition last December, our Berghain Kantine night in collaboration with the admirable Kometenmelodien returns this Thursday, December 3. This time, headlining outré pop wizard LA Priest will be accompanied by no less then two promising local projects: recent Berlin transplants and newcomers Lea Porcelain, whose debut EP (out this week) shows all the compelling feats that make post new wave-informed, noirish guitar pop exciting in 2015. Aside from the boys, we’re especially happy to welcome (back) a true veteran of the city’s subterranean pop scene, Berlin via Paris artist Laura Clock, who you might still remember under her former nom de guerre ButterClock. On Thursday, she will present material from her criminally overlooked EP Baby Part One, which was released by Rinse FM in June.

Doors open at 8. Find more details about the event on Facebook.

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Anna Meredith “R-Type”

30 Nov 2015 — Andrew Darley

On the second single from her debut album, Anna Meredith sweeps listeners into a frantic ride. "R-Type" slowly shuffles in before its relentless beat catapults it into an ascending frenzy of spaceships bleeps and reverberating, writhing guitar. The multi-instrumentalist and composer from Scotland makes an stridently confident statement with this single. There’s a joy and punk spirit in the way she structures the space and progressively builds momentum within her songs, previously seen on her bombastically brassy "Nautilus" single. The beaten-out urgent live drum halfway-through is thrilling set against her intergalactic dance. When "R-Type" takes off, it brings us somewhere else.

Anna Meredith’s debut album Varmints is out in March 2016 on Moshi Moshi.

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Sierra Manhattan “Moonburned Girl” (exclusive)

23 Nov 2015 — Henning Lahmann

It started snowing yesterday and it hasn't really stopped since. Berlin might still be far from turning into a winter wonderland, yet by now summer is nothing but a faint memory. This, and in view of the anxieties and fears in Europe over the past week, it may be songs such as Lyon-based Sierra Manhattan's "Moonburned Girl" that we actually need right now. Everything about this tune not only sounds like summer, but like the summer of 2009 (which tried to sound like the summer of 1986). There is nothing spectacular here, not the slacking rhythm, not the jangly melody, not the sluggishly distorted vocals. But not spectacular is good, or at least comforting, evoking days that were less complicated, less insane, less messy. "Moonburned Girl" is not a song to die to. Now isn't that something?

Sierra Manhattan's self-titled cassette is out tomorrow on Atelier Ciseaux and AB Records. Get one of the 100 copies (or their unlimited digital equivalent) over here.

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Watch: Dmitry Evgrafov “Like Foam” (exclusive)

18 Nov 2015 — Henning Lahmann

During these days of tension and anxiety, reminding ourselves of the beauty that surrounds us is soothing. More than that, it may be necessary to stay sane in the midst of a neverending flow of news and pictures and grieving and fear. Moscow composer Dmitry Evgrafov didn't write the music on his recently released album Collage, so I assume, specifically for situations like the one we all, collectively, find ourselves in since past Friday. Once again. Instead, in his own words, Evgrafov's delicate arrangements merely vent his penchant to be "always restless, always searching" – a deeply romanticist inclination, to be sure, that is all too often prone to clichéed notions of sappy sensations and faux tragedies yet that the young musician consistently manages to absent himself from. Nor was the video for LP centrepiece "Like Foam", with its images of peaceful autumn landscapes and solemnly grazing cows shot in mind with the very human atrocities that we have been confronted with. Yet somehow, and perhaps that's just me, there is a new connotation to the music now, whether intended or not. "Like Foam" is, in its very own, uncommitted way, healing music.

Collage is out on 130701. Get it over here.

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Review: FOANS “Schema”

17 Nov 2015 — Evelyn Malinowski

Here is your checklist of images, trigger phrases, and qualifiers for listening to the prolific and somewhat elusive Denver-based artist FOANS:

-pleasantly bored
-there's a city between me and vast wilderness
-aimless heartbreak
-progressive loops
-implicit drums
-solo week nights
-moments of the midwest in the west
-cozy shadowland
-it feels so familiar and I don't know why
-he makes it seem easy
-I am afraid of soft November skies
-missing the boat completely and slowly accepting the fact that it wasn't meant to be
-November music, oh so good and oh so sad
-the same patterns follow us for the rest of our lives

On occassion, we get to know artists who craft a signature sound so recognizable that we become inspired to establish an interpretive lexicon for describing them, keywords and codes for accessing steady play of their enticing designs. When it comes to FOANS, we are dealing with a bundle of nostalgia candy and studiousness, aesthetic song titles and addicting composition. His latest release on Denmark's Speaker Footage (also a launchpad for ambient pop acts like Temple Volant and AyGeeTee) is breadthy in duration, and a near masterpiece of an album. It is ambient-ready, IDM-esque, sample friendly, steadily melodic. Further, it is a work that can easily be played on repeat, like all FOANS releases, hence the candy reference. Having said that, there still is a quality to Schema that communicates the artist having taken things up a notch.

You know the type of dub ambient that is rhythmic without (much) drumming or dub, like Loscil? That is the place where FOANS hangs out, except that he still doesn't really sound like anyone else. Tracks like "Orsa" and "Copacabana" present percussion, the latter being a most enjoyable and familiar track. With a light and spiraling clarinet sample that reminds me of the one in FSOL's "Max", the melody feels Broken Social Scene-inspired, as it is down-home soothing, polyrhythmic, and - bear with me - Toronto-like: it's all about the way the light hits those low buildings off of Bloor and the nearness of the intimidating body of fresh water. Later, tracks like "Compensation" and "Comment #1" are succinct, catchy, and pro-dance. "Steam" is agreeably of Lobster Theremin caliber with its housey snare hits and wrestling shimmering melodies, balled up by their rolling motion. 

"Lean," however, is an example of percussion-less rhythm. It is thematic and sprinkley, looked after by an agile bass line. When "Sizzle" sneaks in, we have an Aix Em Klemm-cadence of contemplation on our hands. With another notable bass line present, we sense some protectiveness rather than ability, perhaps conveyed by its concentrated persistence. We may sigh and simply give in to one by one acknowledging the layers and calm evolution that they endure.

"Touchscreen" is a breathtaking trance track minus drums, and, due to its potency, it is terribly challenging to recap. Its watery foundation hooks us at once before a Carpenters-sounding vocal loop enters to lead a plethora of gorgeous pad synth formation. The leading melody is truly cinematic, something to inspire grounded optimism for the seasons to come. "Dakan" drives the same point home even more further, and valorously. Just try it, you'll see.

For me, there's something significant about the fact that FOANS is in Denver, Colorado, the bursting-at-the-seams-of-your-white-collar-shirt recreational paradise. Having spent some significant time in that area over the last year, I can testify that Denver is gorgeous, expansive, and both soft and harsh. The atmosphere of the area is complicated and congested: it takes what feels like a full day to get from one area to another (despite all the visible coutryside) and one often catches oneself stuck in a traffic jam on the epic mountain pass on the way to the ski hill, ironically. Isn't skiing an activity that occurs moreso in areas less populated, on a mountain, in the natural world? Isn't part of it all about zoning out and escaping pressures of other people? This is normal speed and paradox for the population of the Denver area, and the empirical knowledge that I simply do not resonate with any part of that lifestyle feels pacified by FOANS. Having music this compelling and atmospheric come out of a place I find vibrationally fucked up, I am able to peer indirectly into the beauty and inspiration it offers so many millions of people; I can have gratitude for the place while lying safely distant from it.

Schema is out now on Speaker Footage. Order the tape here, and be sure to pursue more FOANS here.

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Cherushii “So Far Away So Close”

17 Nov 2015 — Max B.K.

Cherushii's "Far Away So Close" embarks in a sonic playfulness that her productions are known for but then reveals itself for its underlying euphoric dancefloor sensibility. The titular track features touches of saxophone reminiscent of smooth listening, but by the time of the first breakdown, she sets that sax harmony free: it's fun, funny, and scary in equal measures.

Cherushii is a trickster and after the first track she unveils a different dancefloor animal. "Set You Free" is both the strongest and danciest track on the record. Like "Far Away So Close," it only becomes apparent what's at hand after the first breakdown – a floor filler with blissed out, celestial vibes. Cherushii, aka Chelsea Faith, has proven herself adept at layering edifying textures. At times it threatens to be too much, but then she lets the tracks open up and brings it back home, often into acid lines.

She doesn't always go in this direction. The most subdued track, "Night Steps," takes a more minimal approach and is the most ecstatic and sexy track on the record. The EP bookends with "Sweet Spot" – another ecstatic disco romper, showing off her mastery of loops and progression. One gets the feeling that Cherushii could go one forever. After the Memories of Water LP, the last part of her three Bandcamp releases and this EP now, it will be most interesting to see where she is headed next.

Far Away So Close is out on 100% Silk.

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Watch: Erasers “Returning Home” (exclusive)

03 Nov 2015 — Preston Ossman

Perth’s Erasers (not to be confused with similarly named 80s English New Wave duo Erasure) allow their dreamlike ambiance to invite a listener’s interest. Their recent full-length Stem Together is a brisk swim in a briny bath of lo-fi percussive loops and melancholic organ hymnals. Rebecca Orchad’s ghostly incantations build and swell, reverberant crooning resonate on another ethereal plane. At times, the record feels best suited for the pitch-black solitude of an insolation chamber, while at other times opening up to nothing short of a psychedelic sermon, a lulling drone underscoring songs like an understated sonic scripture.

In the group's latest video for the song "Returning Home," the viewer is brought into the congregation on a beam of light. Solar glare glistens on the waves as the group’s atmospheric organ rumble fades into audibility.  ‘On a silver sea / returning you home,’ Orchad repeats. The lyric implies patience in movement, the idling that accompanies any expedition, laying in wait. To travel is merely to pass time between destination and origin, and Erasers emphasise this lacuna. The accompanying visuals to "Returning Home" tell this story of stasis in travel: a single swimmer, in a silver sea no less, paddling in place as the water splits around her; stagnant sediment washed over repeatedly by rolling water; the relentless ripple of one’s own wake. The constant motion that the ocean insists upon is often overlooked by its perennial nature, as if to say, “the ocean isn’t going anywhere,” despite that it is always going, pushing, pulling, occillating like that familiar drone.

Stem Together is out on Fire Talk. Get it over here.

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Watch: Paco Sala “Square Jaw / LGO” (exclusive)

29 Oct 2015 — Henning Lahmann

It's been a while since we last heard from London project Paco Sala aka Anthony Harrison and Leyli. The vocalist having recently relocated to Berlin, the first result since crossing the Channel is a full-length with the fitting name Der Gast, "the guest" – a multi-faceted notion that avoids deliberations about more loaded concepts of existence in contemporary Berlin, such as "tourist", "immigrant", or "expat". To be a guest implies both a limited timeframe and the expectation to be welcome. The two aspects, of course, are intertwined, scantily concealing the word's more twisted connotations (the first generations of immigrants from Turkey and other southern European countries in Germany were labelled Gastarbeiter, "guest workers", in the public discourse, which rather openly hinted at the fact that the German society expected them to leave again and not to settle). 

Musically, "Square Jaw" and "LGO", the first tracks from Der Gast, continue Paco Sala's distinct blend of kosmische-informed synth arrangements and crystalline vocals, though the rhythmic patterns are a little more prominent and dynamic this time around. Watch the video for the single exclusively below.

Der Gast is out on cassette November 6 via Night School Records. Pre-order the tape now over here.

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